Friday, 29 June 2007

Farish on Salman.

Farish Noor, every Malaysian's favourite historian, reminds us what Sir Salman's contributions are:
When I hear the name Rushdie mentioned, I think of the same Salman Rushdie who was writing in the 1980s at the time when Britain was under the rule of Margaret Thatcher, she of the foreigner-hating-ways. For many a young Asian academic and student then, Rushdie was our spokesman, our voice of reason, whose powerful commentaries, op-ed pieces, public lectures, etc. warned of the dangers of racialised communitarianism in Britain. He was the spokesman for the downtrodden, the poor marginalised migrants, the minority communities of Britain. His columns that appeared in the press lambasted, again and again, the racist policies of the Thatcher government and the racism inherent in the world of Occidental academia and writing. It was Rushdie who foregrounded and promoted the writing of Asian authors as English authors, so that their works would not be marginalised and relegated to the margins as ‘exotic’ literature from the Orient. Thanks in part of the efforts of Rushdie and others of his generation, literature from the Indian subcontinent and the rest of Asia has entered the mainstream.
Emphasis mine.

2 comments:

  1. rushdie? hey i saw him on bridget jones' diary!

    ReplyDelete
  2. As did I! I wish I was Helen Fielding's friend too!

    ReplyDelete

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