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Prophets in Battlestar Galactica.

I've only recently jumped on the Battlestar Galactica bandwagon. Until recently, I didn't watch a lot of TV and due to recent changes in my life I finally got round to watching some good TV shows (What? Watch them on terrestrial TV? You must be joking!) thanks to the internets.

One of the shows I finally got round to watching is the very much acclaimed new version of Battlestar Galactica. I've watched the first four episodes of season 4 already and so far, I like what I see! (I haven't got round to downloading the rest of the episodes but will do so once I get a new hard disk drive for the PowerMac.)

The story so far, as I understand it, includes a certain very interesting character by the name of Gaius Baltar. Throughout the series he's been a politician (namely the President of New Caprica), and now, he's becoming some sort of prophet promoting a monotheistic religion, very much in contrast with the more popular polytheistic religion of worshipping Roman-style gods (Apollo, Zeus and gang).

There's been speculation that Gaius Baltar is an allegory of Jesus, and there's even talk of him being actually an allegory of Joseph Smith, the Mormon prophet.

Personally I see more parallels with a much closer prophet, one who I am well acquainted with, but cannot mention due to fear of having the wrath of fundamentalists, terrorists and Malays (among other people) directed towards me.

But I'm sure you know to whom I am referring to.

For context, let me just copy-and-paste from the blog I just referred you to:
Jesus was the Son of God. Gaius, like Joseph Smith, is just a regular person and not divine himself. Joseph Smith was visited by the angel Moroni on numerous occasions (or so he claimed). Gaius is visited regularly by some supernatural entity that reveals itself as a Cylon model Number Six. Or maybe Gaius is just insane, but the Number Six in Gaius’ head is supposed to represent the angel Moroni who visited Joseph Smith. Just as Joseph Smith received religious instructions from Moroni, Gaius receives religious instruction from Number Six.

Joseph Smith and Gaius were both politicians. Joseph Smith was the mayor of the town of Nauvoo, and he announced his candidacy for president of the United States in 1844. Gaius Baltar ran for president of the colonies (and won too). See the similarities?

Unlike Jesus, who was convicted at a trial and sentenced to death, both Joseph Smith and Baltar managed to evade any serious jail time at their trials. Joseph Smith was killed by a mob, and not by the law. It seems to me that the writers of BSG are also setting up Gaius Baltar to be killed by a mob. Every time he's out in public, the mob wants to kill him.

Of course, the biggest similarity between the prophet Joseph Smith and Gaius Baltar is the polygamy! Joseph Smith had two dozen or more wives. Gaius has a harem of female followers. Jesus never had any wife at all.

Thus we see that Gaius is Joseph Smith and not Jesus.
The constant mob attacks, the supernatural entity, the harem... dude! sounds more Prophet M than Joseph Smith to me!

Comments

  1. Urgles... do not tempt me with this... have refrained from TV series for years now... Shall... resist... :P

    Btw, Lady Lemongrass posted a solution for your Google Reader prob in my post's comments. Hope that works for you till I figure it out... no prob when using Firefox though. Go figure.

    ReplyDelete
  2. aku ikut gila siri ni, aku suka gila siri ni (abg aku kat oxford kata, ni sci-fi wajib tonton).. dan ya, Gaius ada kena mengena sedikit dengan apa yg kau cakapkan tu, minus the 'main-main selak baju' dengan 'bidadari'nya dan minus the 'buta huruf' (Gaius pandai gila).

    ReplyDelete
  3. Kenny: Okay, Lemongrass's solution certainly helped! Thanks.

    Fadz: I have to agree... BSG is a must-watch if you're a sf fan... I'm regretting I didn't watch from the beginning.

    ReplyDelete

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