Skip to main content

Interview with Faulks. Sebastian Faulks.

Entertainment Weekly grills Sebastian Faulks on being the new Bond author, his new Bond book, Devil May Care, and David Craig's take on the franchise:
Oh, he was certainly a lot tougher than Roger Moore, who was very soft. You felt that if you punched Roger Moore in the stomach it would be like punching a bag of marshmallows. And Fleming does stress the cruelty of Bond, particularly in the early novels. I think that was one of the things that made the creation appealing and rather shocking when it first came out. But if you actually analyze the way that Bond behaves, both towards his enemies, and towards women, it isn’t actually a sadistic or unnecessarily cruel. He only kills in self-defense, or if absolutely necessary for his mission. Although he is an incurable womanzier, he doesn’t actually treat the women badly. In fact, he frequently falls in love with them and is jilted by them sometimes.
I totally agree. Roger Moore was such a total wimp, I'm perplexed as to why he survived being Bond for seven films.

George Lazenby is the best Bond evah!!!11

Comments

  1. no he's not ted. no he's not. *shakes head in sadness*

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh ok. Daniel Craig is numero uno. George Lazenby comes next.

    ReplyDelete
  3. George Lazenby? Ya, he was so good they retired him after one Bond flick so he didn't top himself again.

    Timothy Dalton also had just one Bond flick.

    Actually, IMHO, the best Bond was David Niven who apparently had been Ian Fleming's preference for the part of James Bond, but the production company chose Sean Connery. (Source: Wikipedia: David Niven) And Niven was in a Bond flick, the satire Casino Royale (1967 version).

    ReplyDelete
  4. Actually, response to the movie was good enough, Lazenby was scheduled to shoot Diamonds Are Forever (the movie after On Her Majesty's Secret Service) when his agent suggested to him that the Bond franchise was going nowhere. Unfortunately he listened! Gah!

    David Niven? Hah! Between him, Peter Sellers, Woody Allen and Ursula Andress as James Bond in that version of Casino Royale, I'd take Ursula Andress anytime!

    btw, has anyone seen the 1954 adaptation? Peter Lorre has a great role as Le Chiffre! That smarmy bastard in the 2006 version doesn't even come close!

    ReplyDelete

Post a comment

Popular posts from this blog

HOWTO: Get Rid of Silverfish

The bane of every book collecting person: the Silverfish. DUN DUN DUNNNNN!!!

How to get rid of them?

If one book has been infected, place it inside an air-tight plastic bag along with some silica gel desiccant. The silica gel is important to get rid of moisture, because you will now place the sealed plastic bag with the book in it inside the freezer. Leave it in there for a couple of days so that those bugs catch their death of cold.

If you're feeling particularly paranoid, (like I usually am) feel free to leave the plastic bag in there for a week. If they're not dead, then you might likely have an infestation of zombie silverfish, which is out of the scope of this blogpost.

But what if a whole colony of silverfish decided to invade your whole bookcase? Then you have to make sure you're ready for war.

Place a generous amount of silica gel (or if you can find it, diatomaceous earth) behind your books at the back of the shelves so that moisture levels remain low. Silverfish l…

Hitting 1000.

Last night Sharon quoted Raman of having said to writers when they bring him their manuscripts for publishing, "How many books have you read? Have you read a thousand books? If not, get out and go read a thousand books, then come back with your manuscript." His point being, you've got to have read a lot if you want to be a writer.

And I thought to myself, a thousand books isn't so bad. I've probably read more.

Er...Wrong.

After some quick calculations, we determined that if a person read a book per week, it would take around 20 years to reach a thousand. I'm a slow reader. I'm only 25. There's no way I've read 1000 books my whole life!

When I got home I counted the books in my house. I estimate I own around 300 books, probably another 300 left at my parents's house. That's only around 600 books that I own... and a lot less that I've read!

So with that number in mind, I have resolved to start keeping track of my book reading. I need to know …

The Water Tower.

Back in February, I heard that local publisher Silverfish was accepting submissions for their new short story compilation. I've always wanted to get into some serious writing, so I sat down and wrote The Water Tower. Then I rewrote it again for another six times. But alas, the story was rejected. Oh well. Here it is anyway. I present to you, my first short story. Enjoy! (Please?):
Suresh once asked what I loved so much about exploring.

“Seeing new things, new places. Seeing what kids in the other neighbourhoods do in the evenings,” I had said.

“The kids elsewhere do the same thing other kids do lah,” he replied.

“No, sometimes they have different activities. What they do depends on what’s around them. And what’s around them is what I look forward to finding when I go exploring.”

“What do you mean, around them? Like what?”

“Like the airport. The kids in that neighbourhood play different games than in other housing areas. I think it’s the noise. Or the planes.”

“The airport! Now that’s fun…